Sunday, June 17, 2012

Queen's Club Final - David Gets Defaulted

















Update
This, in the pic above, was how it started. The end, however, was not quite as picturesque. At 7-6(3), 3-4 for David, he vented his frustation about having just lost his serve again by viciously kicking a board. Something that he tends to do on court but in this case, he hurt the linesman who was sitting behind that board. And because of that, David got defaulted.

A way of losing the match that will have its consequences for him, also beyond the match itself. What those consequences will look like exactly, that remains to be seen.

I'll wait with my post about this match and all that went and might still go with it until tomorrow, when the dust has settled a bit.


(Getty Images; montage by VD)












It's been a strange week with the rain and the delays. I won some very good matches and I'm happy with the way I'm playing. These victories are good, going to Wimbledon and the Olympics.
A strange week for David, and one of following his matches mostly on the scoreboard for us. But it's also been a strange week at the Queen's Club in general, with the top seeds going out early and the draw opening up unexpectedly for David. In the past, he was often unable to take advantage of situations like that. But normal rules just don't seem to apply this week...
So today, David gets to play the second final on grass of his career, ten years after his surprise run to the Wimbledon final back in 2002. It's his first final since Auckland 2011.

In it, he gets to face a player he has a positive match record against (standing at 4-1 in David's favour) and has beaten before this year, in the second round at Indian Wells. But Marin Cilic also inflicted a very painful defeat on David this year, by beating him during the Davis Cup quarterfinal tie in April. Becoming only the second player (after Nikolay Davydenko) to defeat David at the Parque Roca. Another match in very windy conditions. In David's words:
When we played in Davis Cup, the wind that we had was horrible. It was a bad match, that's a fact, and when it's like that you can't take anything from it. Just like today [i.e. yesterday] you don't know what you did well or badly.
What both David and Marin Cilic did well yesterday was handling the conditions better than their opponents. Today, however, it's apparently not as windy in London as it was yesterday.

To get to this final, sixth seed Cilic (#25) beat, after a bye in the first round, Matthew Ebden and Lukas Rosol before profiting from Yen-Hsun Lu's retirement in the quarterfinal. In the semifinal yesterday, he overcame former Queen's Club champion Sam Querrey in three sets. David's (very brief) assessment of his opponent and his game:
He's a very complete player with very good shots, especially the serve. I'll have to be wary.
But also Cilic knows that he'll have to be wary of David and his strengths:
It's very difficult to play against him because most of the time he's in control of the game and with the return and the groundstrokes he doesn't give you many chances. You have to be smart in the game, know how to put the ball away from him and put him in tough positions that he can't really control it.
(Quotes: source.)
Let's hope he can control it - VAMOS DAVID!

166 comments:

  1. Some very dark clouds again over the Queen's Club... Let's hope the weather holds.

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  2. Vamos David!!!!
    I see some clouds above the centre court, hope it's nothing serious.

    Vamos!

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  3. sorry Julia, I posted the same comment as yours about the clouds :$

    players about to go on court! Vamos!

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  4. Can't be said often enough. ;)

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  5. ouch, nothing serious for David, I hope, the grass is slippy!! aaaaah :/

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  6. David looks pretty comfortable on Cilic's first service game, hope he can serve well.
    Vamos!

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  7. WOW some beautiful shots from David so far!
    when he comes to the net it's just wonderful to watch.
    And pretty good serve so far, vamos!!!!

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  8. not looking good for David :/

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  9. no service winner for David at the moment

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  10. and Cilic serving very good

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  11. even on challange he is losing to Cilic

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  12. and now he can lose even the tiebreak

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  13. Are you doing an adam/isis impersonation?

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  14. David, the tiebreak monster! :D

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  15. yaaaaaaaaaaaay AND he can hit ace on critical time hehehe :D
    no really it was important for him to win the 1st set as Cilic begun to play better and he found his serve again.
    I'm so excited but it's not over! VAmos!!

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  16. Yay! Ye,s the tiebreak monster, thought the same :-)! Vamos David!

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  17. It is looking to be a drama today, Cilic is in his best form probably. And the ball isn't jumping sometimes today.

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  18. he loses his first service game after 30:0 :(

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  19. David is playing a final. Why not sit back and enjoy getting to see him play? :)

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  20. Cilic continues serving good

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  21. If I only could :) I can't it, seeing him having difficulties and no chance on return

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  22. He's a break down but he has won the first set. And it's not a coincidence that Cilic is in this final. Of course he's also playing well at the moment. ;)

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  23. oh not again a break

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  24. Whats going on...? The commentator is talking about disqualification and whats not

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  25. Absolutely horrible. David would never have done that on purpose. It's as bad for Cilic as it is for David :-(

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  26. I can't believ it, disqualification for David :((( David didn't see at that moment the jude judge, so unlucky end :(

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  27. He did do it on purpose. He just didn't realise he might hurt someone...

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  28. OMG people are going to talk trash about David after this incident :(

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  29. Kicking that board on purpose, I mean.

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  30. He should have realised the judge was there, I agree, but in the heat of the moment we all do stupid things without thinking of the consequences :-(

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  31. In this case stupid enough to get defaulted...
    Goodness me. We've had just about everything here in on VD but that's a first.

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  32. I don't believe it. So unfortunate. I'm sure all he saw was the sign. This is really going to be hard for David to cope with.

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  33. Is a DSQ not a bit harsh, isn't it? It was not on purpose... I mean it is a final and end it with a DSQ is tough, I think...

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  34. He ended up hurting the linesmen. Who was bleeding. You hurt someone, you get disqualified.

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  35. I saw the replay..it's so unfortunate. Seems like it's an auto DQ for any similar situation. Boos from the crowds..I can totally understand.

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  36. From a guy thats been on tour for 12 years, been at the top of the game, a very stupid thing to do, under any circumstances.Really makes him look bad, very bad.

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  37. He kicks things all the time on court. But he should've been aware that someone was sitting there.

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    1. Destroying the whole thing for Cilic, the crowd who paid good money, the tournament and himself.I hope they dont ban him but I do feel they will.Should take all his winnings from Queens as a fine.

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    2. Yeah, there might be consequences for David beyond this match.

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  38. I can't understand David in that moment in the heat. David is always good for surprises, that's a new one :)

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  39. POOR David POOR

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  40. So unfortunate...I can't even put it in words :(

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  41. What a disappointing end to a great week for David. He chose the wrong board to hit, he should have saved it for his chair, like Djokovic at Roland Garros last week :-(

    I feel for Cilic too, it's a rubbish way for him to take the title.

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  42. He probbaly get banned from wimbledon and olympia

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  43. Good mature speech from Cilic. Really want to hear from David.

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  44. David cheer up, just learn from your mistakes, but plays so on. Daviiiiid

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  45. very well said David

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  46. such a shame that David getsbad publicity after the incident

    https://twitter.com/MiguelSeabra/status/214372216563957760 >> :( :(

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  47. That tweet is just pointing out the possible consequences.

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  48. I don't know about that. The commentator from the stream I watch was criticizing his speech,saying he should just said sorry to everyone for being rash and leave it at that. Not the other way round.

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  49. Yeah, I think that speech could've done without the part about the ATP and the rulebook.

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  50. Hi everyone. Just as disappointed as you are with what happened. I do feel that there will be some consequences...not just decided on yet. At the very least, a ban from playing Queens in the future...at the most, that and a ban from the rest of the grass-court season.

    What I hope David does is to address the situation directly...not hide his face in the sand or deny what happened. If he doesn't, he's giving others the chance to spin the situation to their advantage.

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    1. He did address the crowd directly after the match. But to be honest, I wasn't really happy with the way he did.

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    2. Arghhh...unfortunately, I don't have TC where I live, so I missed this. So, there was NO "I'm sorry" in the sincere, contrite way that "sorry" should be delivered, considering the circumstances? I mean, heck, this was an opportunity to redeem himself before the crowd. Now...people will actually start believing that he's the grouchy, grumpy narrative the press paints of him.

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    3. He did say that he aplogised. But he also said a few other things he should've better kept to himself.

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    4. Yeah...I read downstream about that. Yeah, he should have keep all that extra out...and just apologized. Since he has social media accounts....BANG, apologize there and move the heck on.

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    5. He did apologise albeit a little disgruntled,those were his first words before his ATP tirade. I'm pretty sure David felt it was extremely harsh to outright DQ him and was probably thinking if there was a chance to resume play.

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  51. How long of a suspension could possibly come out?

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  52. Such a huge chance to win queens and get a title on all surfaces (and that achieve not many).... Shame on you David :( :( :(

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  53. I'm glad David said sorry, but a bit unimpressed at him blaming ATP rules. He was trying (badly) I think to say something about the way the weather went against him this week, but he'd have been better off saying "I messed up, I'm really sorry" and leaving it at that.

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    1. Agree wholeheartedly. The rest of it is mere excuse-making and is out of keeping with the context of the situation.

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  54. Im big fan of David but he deserved this,hes just to nervous in this season and im not suprised becouse of this at all.I hope that he will stay positive.

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  55. Well, is he just diqualified? or are they going to withhold him from points aswell? And yes that speach could've been better. He was completely wrong, hurting that guy. Even though he has been my childhood fan. He should just say that "sometimes players get emotional and do things" and That he accepts the decision, made by the ATP.

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    1. Mik, they will probably award him the points, but the money? Probably not.

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  56. All that matters now if will he get suspended or just fined.

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    1. With that incident, he may get suspended.

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  57. The part of speech against the ATP was inappropriate, no wonder press and people will talk bad about him...
    he should've stopped after the apologies and that's it. He knew he could do nothing against the rule, so he could've only accepted it and move on. No wonder ATP might think of suspension or any other sanction, even if they didn't think about it in the 1st place.
    I'm so frustrated...

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    Replies
    1. He sure did give them a "great" idea, didn't he?

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  58. I never saw a case like that in tennis.... So i really think the consequences will be HUGE :(

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  59. I read that the ATP supervisor said that a fine is more realistic because he didn't it on purpose.

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    1. *didn't do it* sorry for that typo

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    2. Still no news about the final on ATP.com.Ill never stop supporting David but man, I really really cant believe he did this.

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    3. Maybe a fine...but, since the Olympics are coming up, whoever is over that in tennis has looked at this incident for sure...as well as the Argentine Tennis Federation. They can independently say "no, you cannot compete as part of the team."

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    4. The ATP Supervisor was also not really shocked by his speach because he was already complaining about court with him all week, so he said he is not surprised that David complained about it....

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  60. Im acc soo upset, feel to cry :'( should not have done that but frustration led to things. He done a mistake but it was unintentional which makes me soo angry!! Completely agree with david although he maybe shdnt have said anything about the atp. Hes a legend. Nalby foreveer, nalbys a legend. Such sad times but i fricking hate people who dont watch tennis and comment bullshit about david

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  61. you just think what Serena W. has often done in the past, but for her it was only prize penalty.

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  62. hope that it's confirmed for David !

    https://twitter.com/MiguelSeabra/status/214378648181022721

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  63. That would be very good news. Yeah, hope it gets confirmed.

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    1. That there won't be consequences for David beyond the tournament itself.

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  64. That would be really good.

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  65. Sorry but I couldn't watch any of it.. What exactly did he said? Thanks

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  66. rules are rules, no question about that.

    people can blame David's behavior if they want to (even if we know he didn't mean to hurt the line judge on purpose), but it's sickening me to read so called journalists like Cronin tweeting things like that >> https://twitter.com/TennisReporters/status/214377494655152128

    now waiting for a confirmation that David won't get sanctions after this final...

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    1. Why even read what Cronin etc write?

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    2. I actually have a "Nalbandian" stream on my Twitter client and anyone tweeting and mentioning his name appear in my stream, I have to use some filters :(

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    3. I do not read Cronin and Bodo because of their inability to steer away from the grumpy, grouchy David narrative.

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    4. Well, I try my best on VD to show people that he's not the eternally grumpy sourpuss.
      Sometimes though, he does make it rather difficult for me.

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  67. That's the most unfortunate way for a final to end for sure! Bad for David, Cilic, the crowd, the organizers, everyone!!

    Totally uncalled for from David, he's definitely been having a bad temper on court lately,he usually hits the ad boards and throw his raquet,but this time with hurting someone he definitely wasn't going to get away with it :(

    I believe similar things have happened before though...I guess Coria hit a ball girl with his raquet before right? she wasn't hurt though...I can't remember what were the consequences but I guess he continued the match. And I think there was another incident with Clement too...

    Anyways, guess we'll just have to wait and see
    what the ATP has to say about this and if David will be disqualified from Wimbledon and the Olympics!
    I have to admit I'm a little angry at David too :(

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  68. Apparently, according the to the ATP supervisor, there won't be consequences for David beyond the tournament itself.

    And I'm a little angry (or more than just a little), myself...

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    1. Definitely the lowest point of his career imo.Will be hard to bounce back.

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    2. Mar del Plata will be remembered by David and Argentina fans.This will go down as one of the worst meltdowns in tennis history.

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    3. Mar del Plata was the lowest point for David.
      This match will go down as the most bizarre ever final at the Queen's Club and it'll turn into an anecdote commentators will love to bring up or joke about during his matches. But still lightyears away from the likes of McEnroe and Connors, to name only two. ;)

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    4. No....this is officially THE lowest point in his career...after all that shook down yesterday.

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    5. In the eyes of the people and the journalists, who are making a huge fuss about a single, thoughtless but unintentional act it surely is. It'll pass.
      But at Mar del Plata, so much more was at stake, the accusations were so much more grave (they went far beyond what was written in the English-speaking press) and I think that what people in Argentina think of him matters far more to David than the rest of the world.

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  69. http://www.tennis.com/articles/templates/news.aspx?articleid=18250&zoneid=25
    he will lose all points ???

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  70. Yeah, I think losing all points and prize money is what usually happens when you get defaulted. Whether there'll be an additional fine or something - we'll see.

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    1. Julia,

      To my knowledge, the part about losing points in a default never happened. At least not with Johnny Mac or Serena...and I think I know why. Not fair to David...but it is what it is.

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  71. I'm so very sorry, gutted infact, David didn't intend to hurt anyone, the unfortunate line judge was in the right place at the wrong time, I must say, that hoarding must have been very flimsy. David isn't the first player to whack out at an object, I'm not condoning his actions, but understand, he just got unlucky today.. There was nothing the supervisor could do but default under the existing ATP rules. I think the majority would have been more content with a second set default rather than the match. Cilic would not have wanted a victory like this, he's a gracious and fair guy.

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    1. true, I see now why I had a bad feeling from the begin of this match, I hope these feelings want come again with its consequences

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    2. not "want" haha but "won't"

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  72. Hope the dust indeed does settle and the penalty isn't too severe. This incident is really small potatoes, though, compared to some of the stuff Connors and McEnroe did. They, however, never drew blood. Still, they were unrepentant. I think that should count for something with David. He did apologize, after all. And then what about Serena Williams threatening to kill the lines person after having a foot fault called against her in the finals of the 2009 U.S. Open. She got off real light after that incident. Here's hoping for the best for David. And hoping he can put this behind him very quickly.

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    1. Absolutely agree on all counts.

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  73. Geez, while all this has been going on I see Haas stunned Federer at Halle. Way to go Tommy. Let's hoist one for the old guys.

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  74. FueBuena saying hes gonna lose the ranking points this week and all the prize money with a additional fine of up to 10 000$

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  75. Yeah, that's pretty much what had to be expected. A fine on top of the lost ranking points and prize money, I mean.

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    1. I just hope it stays at that, think he passed well.Pretty much as close you can get to a suspension.

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  76. He didn't do it on purpose, so - no.
    It was a stupid, unfortunate thing to do. But that's not why I'm angry.

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    1. Good decision on waiting with the post till tomorrow Julia!
      I totally agree! I'm mad at him for doing such a stupid thing but he didn't mean to. People speaking of suspension is just too much!

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    2. I'm not angry about all the stuff that gets written now about David. I couldn't care less about that.
      I'm angry about how he handled the situation. Acting like he was the victim of the ATP and its rulebook.

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    3. I also felt that he wasnt really concerned about the linesman, overall bad day and one to hopefully forget soon.

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    4. People talking 'suspension' etc., usually comes from those who have never played competitive sport and such judgmental lust for punishment is way over the top. Eric Cantona, the football star was suspended because he deliberatly flew a kick at a fan in the stands, totally different to what happened today.

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    5. Point taken but I knew the moment he said "wait" that he wasn't going to say something smart!

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    6. Oh camilia, thanks for the laugh, I could really use it. :)

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    7. Glad I made you laugh, I'm usually good at making people laugh :p

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  77. Sorry guys but I have to celebrate this! I got the picture verification thing right and had my post published from the first try. Never happened before, usually I have to be tortured for at least 3 tries :p

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  78. Rule 8.04 of the ATP rule book states a player guilty of aggravated behaviour can expect to be fined "up to $25,000 or the amount of prize money won at the tournament, whichever is greater".
    Given that the runners-up prize money at Queen's is 44,945 euros (£36,114 or $56,803), Nalbandian stands to lose more.

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    1. Ranking points, prize money and a fine of up to $10.000 as mentioned above.

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  79. It is like when players have thrown racquets. Xavier Malisse got defaulted in Miami some years ago when he hit a line judge.
    "It is the same situation as when Tim Henman hit the ball and hit a ball girl as she ran across the court

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  80. what saddens me is how people who didn't even see what happened try to deform the truth, trying to imply that David is a bad guy who did hit the line judge on purpose.
    I really hope that once the decision is made, the fine is paid and the points are lost, people will move on... (unfortunately, it's too fresh and they won't forget, as Wimbledon is coming soon, so maybe after that...)
    The fact that David publicly criticised the ATP during his speech has made him have the position of the "rude guy" (though we can imagine he was upset, so were we)

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    1. Don't worry too much about what people think of him! What really matters that he recovers and not let this affect his performance during Wimbledon. I was really excited that he has playing well and I would like to see him continue to play and raise up his game

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    2. I believe that David is aware enough of how his mini-tirade against the ATP would be taken. He does not have the latitude of most other players to do that. As I said before, a simple apology would have sufficed.

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  81. Don't take it all too seriously. Let them talk. :)

    Upset? Certainly. And really sorry. But I'd say most of all for himself.

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  82. Yeah exactly true.. But I hate people who don't watch nalby comment bs. He done a mistake and it wasn't on purpose, he's dealing with tough consequences. I think david shouldnt have said anything abOut ATP but I reckon he was just really frustrated at that point. Understandably so, what a week he has all for nothing. I just hope he regroups and comes bam more determined and fighting. It was really unlucky that happened and were all Devestated about it. I really hope people understand that there was no malicious intent because david actually is a nice guy. After the dust settles we can take positives from the week tho

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  83. Ok guys let's all put this behind us and focus on something positive! For me, it's football time and Germany better win this match and brigten my day! If you are not a football fan, find something that migh make you feel better and do it :D

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  84. Yep, time for football now. :)

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  85. Cronin now saying that if its 10 000$ and you add the 8 from the AO since it was this year it makes it a 2 month suspension.

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  86. And Matt Cronin would certainly love that...

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  87. Okay, time for football now!

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  88. Win for holland!! Come on gerMany need u to beat the danes

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  89. Some very contrite tweets from David this past 30 minutes or so...

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  90. From David's PR department. He doesn't tweet anything, himself.

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  91. Maybe he tells them to tweet? And whats PR?

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  92. Public relations. The people in charge of dealing with the press. Those tweets are the official statement by David that was released for the press by his spokesman.

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  93. I'm so sad about the whole situation, yes David should have controlled the moment better and should have left the ATP out of it a that moment. The crowd wasnt as bad as I thought the would be.

    I bet the papers tommorow are going to have a good time with this, as the England papers are known for bad mouthing people.

    I just really hope its just a small fine for David, they should not attack his ranking point because he faught hard to get into the finals and that mistake should not cost him the entire tournament points.

    I hope he just learns to control his temper. if there are any medical bills for the linesman to pay that, probably issue another apology and just keep his head up. Its disapointing but take the positives from this tournament and how he fought hard to make it to the finals.....

    Buena Suerte David, los vemos en Wimbeldon.

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    1. Yeah defo, such a good week overshadowed today. He did a mistake but at the end of the day was unintentional and they have got to take that into consideration. I'll pick a paper up straight away tomoz and let ya lot know but it just pisses me off that he gets bad rep from this and people think hes some selfish, crazy, rude guy which he isnt. Hope he comes back fighting stronger in wimbledon.

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    2. George,

      The running theme in the media is the surly, grouchy guy-even when the conversation is NOT about him...shows you how powerful and dominant it is. If another player had committed the same offense, the consequences would not have been as harsh or as swift. For him, because of his "reputation," the consequences were meant to be personal and tailored to HIM specifically. It is unfair, but that's how the ATP rolls. If you're not their favorite, then you're basically outside looking in...and hope like heck they treat you gently and not throw you under a locomotive.

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  94. They already took of his points, only question now will they fine him extra and does accumulating a high amount of fines result in a suspension.

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    1. Is the taking away of points actually confirmed or an assumption? Even the insinuation of such is excessive to me. Take the doggone prize money; money can be gained and lost every day of the week. But ranking points? No fair.

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    2. As mentioned before, you get defaulted, you lose your ranking points. As confirmed by the new rankings.

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  95. I watched Germany with friends and had a good time... In that situation i forgot this stupid shit for a couple hours but back at home now im really angry about David again :( Let's Hope the Best

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  96. Wow they should not have taken the ranking points away from him. This was an honest mistake. Maybe prize money but rankings? So upsetting because he faught so hard to get to the finals. I honestly think the points came from the ATP comment he made. I really don't see why he would lose ranking points for this.

    Well so much for being seeded at Wimbeldon. Iray the tennis Gods bless him and don't give hide any of the top 4 Seeds early. Don't worry David you willull through this one.

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  97. The whole episode is incredible. There's no excuse for what he did, but there's nothing rational about passion in sport, so one shouldn't be looking for one. It is clear that he was merely venting his frustration and that it was an unfortunate accident.
    But i'm intrigued by his comments about the ATP.
    His tirade may not have been warranted but it demonstrates a certain frustration with the association and a sense of powerlessness among the players, basically echoing what Nadal, Davydenko et. al. have said before. I have been following pro tennis for years yet know so little about the ATP that governs it. There are also very few opportunities for outsiders to know about it. It is the Association of Tennis Professionals, but i'm interested to know about the extent to which players have a say in running the tour as opposed to being subjected to the decisions of professional managers whose only interest is to parasitically profit from it. The heading of the report of the Queens final on the ATP website, "Cilic wins title" , says much about the extent to which the ATP goes to preserve its image. Anyone have thoughts on this?

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    1. I echo your thoughts. This unfortunate incident is past, I'm sure David will reflect on it with regret and sadness, he is a decent human being but nobody is perfect. I will always be a fan, and root for him at Wimby. Let your racquet do the talking, David, because you're still a wonderful tennis player. Cheer up, Julia, enjoy the footie, lol I'm avoiding it!

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  98. Well, the incident itself was unfortunate, of course. But let me ask you this, do you think that there would've been a single word about the ATP from David, had he won this match?

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  99. Any information as to whether he'll be allowed to play at Wimbledon?!

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  100. Exactly my point, Julia. I think for the most part the players on tour are
    "paid off" for their silence with all the perks, so they keep their counsel, put up with their dissatisfaction etc.
    It is only every now and again that we hear a murmur or two to suggest that not all is well.
    It is why I think Nadal is admirable: it takes a lot of courage to be as successful as he and to
    speak up at the same time. You are right: David would not have said a thing about the ATP if he had won, but now that he didn't and said what he did, he's piqued my curiosity about the
    inner workings of the ATP. After all, the penalty that has been imposed is rather severe: all points and all prizemoney earned with no possibility of an appeal? One has to ask what gives the Association such powers ... it is after all the poor guy's wages for the week.

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  101. I think you misunderstood me. This isn't about the ATP on a general level. This is about David, feeling hard done by and also sorry for himself. He complained about the conditions at QC all week (which were of course the same for all the players), he thought the courts were unplayable. But the ATP said they were okay. That's what he was talking about. As in, they only apply the rules against him.
    And for the record, he would've had the chance to appeal the decision but he chose not to.

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    1. Thanks for clarying Julia, I didn't know David complained about the playing conditions at QC. The incident and default was the straw that broke the camel's back, so he let rip. I'm sure the players do have issues with the ATP, I sympathise, but a lone voice at the time and a tantrum will do little to change it.

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  102. Thanks for your clarification.
    There's of course the case of David feeling victimised as you described above.
    But David did also specifically use the pronouns "we"/"us" on several occasions in that post-match interview with Sue Barker (http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/tennis/18477938), indicating that his dissatisfaction with the ATP wasn't just personal but was felt by others as well: "Sometimes the ATP do a lot, a lot of mistakes to the players.. That's why the players disagree to the ATP."
    The question is whether there is some validity to his claim or whether, as you say, it's just a case of a disgruntled David projecting his personal dissatisfaction onto his peers.
    Regardless, does someone have the knowledge to cast more light on the inner workings of the ATP?

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  103. I think the situation he was in when he said those words had a big impact on what he said and also on how he said it. And, as I've mentioned before, I don't think there would've been any criticism of the ATP, had he won this match.

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    1. >And, as I've mentioned before, I don't think there would've been any criticism of the >ATP, had he won this match.

      I agree. As i said, that's why dissent never gets out: equanimity is maintained as long as players are winning, paid off etc. That does not dispense with the question of power that the ATP wields over players.

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  104. So, to be sure, the concerns are expressed again by David in a different context below. He is referring to a general problem with the ATP that players are confronted with:

    Afterwards, the former Wimbledon finalist was asked to explain why he had criticised the ATP and responded by saying it was difficult for the players to have any influence.
    "At the beginning of the year you have to sign that you agree with everything the ATP says," he said. "And sometimes you don't. If you don't want to sign, you cannot play ATP tournaments so you don't have a chance to ask [about something] or to change something.
    "So if you don't sign, you don't play and you have to agree 100% with what the ATP says."

    (Excerpt from:http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/tennis/18480270)

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  105. I know, I used this quote in my latest post, which is up now.

    I've been a David fan for many years. And I'll always love the way he plays. But there are things that David isn't particularly good at. And apologising and taking responsibility for his actions are among those.

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    1. I feel the same on all counts you mention. David isn't his best PR, never has been, I go way back as a fan too. I would be interested to hear what other top players thought about this affair.

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    2. Well, I like that he's not media-trained, not spin-doctored, not always saying the "right" things to the press. But apologising really isn't something that comes easily to David...

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    3. But his personal shortcomings (inability to apologise etc.) aside, this, below is a genuine concern, no? Does anyone have thoughts on this - aside from casting it as an attempt by David to shirk responsibility?

      "And sometimes you don't. If you don't want to sign, you cannot play ATP tournaments so you don't have a chance to ask [about something] or to change something.
      "So if you don't sign, you don't play and you have to agree 100% with what the ATP says."

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    4. Well, he obviously didn't agree 100% with what the ATP says, yesterday.
      I mean, what did it all begin with? David complaining about the courts and the ATP decision that they were ready to be played on. Did any other players complain about the conditions? As far as I've seen - no.

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    5. I didn't hear of any complaints from other players, I'm sure Murray would have voiced an opinion had he not been taken out in the first round by Mahut. I have to give credit to Chris Kermode who I'm sure wouldn't have allowed play if conditions were that bad, was David complaining about the wind? slippery conditions? Kermode was also very sympathetic towards David, a default was the last thing he wanted.

      Hate to report this, the police may have become involved, who made the complaint?? Frankly I would have thought the Met Police have more serious issues to contend with, but they have to investigate a complaint.

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