Thursday, February 24, 2011

David injured - but will play Davis Cup

After first rumours appeared about David, having more serious physical problems (perhaps hernia) on various Twitters, this is now the current news situation:

According to Guillermo Salatino (on his show "En La Red"), David is suffering from an "inguinal sports hernia on the left side" and first experienced problems during his match against Starace at the Copa Claro. However, also according to Salatino, David is going to play Davis Cup.

The grave news in this context is, as Danny Miche points out, that this kind of problem requires surgery. Which could mean another break of several months for David after the upcoming Davis Cup tie...

Update
According to a new MundoD article, David underwent an examination today, which showed that he's had hernia for four years. (Don't ask me how they established that.) In any case, his spokesman Bernardo Ballero confirmed that David will play Davis Cup. The article also says that David is "currently meeting with Tito Vázquez to discuss the next steps".

UpdateII (25/02)
Here's the latest round of info from the Argentine press.

- Apparently, consulting a specialist in Buenos Aires, who conducted a laparoscopy, led to the correct diagnosis. Prior to that, the hernia was not detected because of its asymptomatic nature. Which means that it didn't cause David pain - until the Starace match, which is when the symptoms began when he tried to run down a drop-shot. After the Copa Claro, it was initially misdiagnosed.

- Today, David will be heading back home to Unquillo for some more rest. Before on Sunday evening, he'll return to Buenos Aires and then spend the next week with the team, getting treatment and trying to prepare for the tie. David's spokesman Ballero:
"David will be available for the team. This injury doesn't keep him from playing normally, although he'll be in some pain."
- According to Clarin, at the moment David is not considering surgery. Whether that's a sign that he might be able to continue playing, with constant treatment perhaps, or that David doesn't want to accept what will be inevitable in the end - only time will tell.
(Sources: Clarin, Cancha Llena & La Mañana de Cordoba)

65 comments:

  1. If it requires surgery Im not sure if he will ever come back.Very bad news.Hope it doesnt require surgery.

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  2. oh no,that is a bad news.I didn't expect that the injury will be of this size. nalby is Unlucky Player :( ..

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  3. Geeeeeez. Bummer!

    He should just retire from DC for a year.
    He's not going to do anybody any good with these continuous injuries, especially on clay courts.
    Injuries that require surgery no less.
    What in the world is he thinking!

    Very disappointing.

    IMO...take another long rest, start all over and recover the right way....play only hard courts....and when he's 100%, then play the DC and clay (maybe).

    To me it was obvious he was not right on the clay....no good results at all, and more importantly, he was not physically stressed at all and yet he still had a groin injury with Robredo...after maybe one set? That just tells me he was never in any kind of shape to play clay to begin with. I figured he knew this and he would be smart enough to hold back, play half speed and protect himself. But that's hard to do when you get in the heat of battle.


    Very disappointing since he seemed to be doing half way decently just before the AO - at Auckland. [Unlike others, getting to the final of Auckland and losing because of his physical conditioning was just fine with me for that point in time of his recovery.] He seemed to be having steady progress in the physical area.

    Staying healthy is priority #1, #2, and #3. Not challenging Nadal, or winning tournaments, and beating Ferrer because the guy is "inferior" to him.

    Without his health, he can kiss his career good bye and forget about being in the top ten.

    Now it seems like he's thrown away a lot of the hard work conditioning-wise getting to where he is (which was *decent* and good!).

    Back to square one. :(

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  4. The thing is, I can't think of anything that would keep David from playing DC and therefore playing on clay because Argentina always play on clay.

    On the other hand, his DC obsession may still be what could keep him going, even when faced with the prospect of another surgery.
    It's a double-edged sword, after all.

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  5. Well, Julia, he may do the impossible and win his DC match despite a serious injury.

    But, the fact is his level of play on the clay was not that great and if I was the coach, I would trust Chela to be a much better performer on clay.
    And if he does win, what about the rest of the DC season (on the Argentine clay)? He will still be deemed unreliable....a good coach should see right through this.
    David has to realize that unless he does the right thing, he's going to be useless to anybody. His passion and good intentions will not be enough for an entire run of the DC. Yeah, maybe he will do great, but the odds are against him big time....at least on clay. Maybe save him for hard-courts after another protracted wait for him to get healthy.


    All DC matches in Argentina are clay and I don't know how anybody would want to rely on him to win a clay match.

    He has to realize that...or the people around him have to?

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  6. Okay, I don't think you got the point I was trying to make.
    The point is that wanting to win DC has been David's big goal for years and it has kept him going. And that is why I hope it will still keep him going and wanting to come back if he should find himself facing another surgery.

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  7. Maybe its just pain,his hip is never gonna be 100%,same thing as if you break your ligaments in your knee or ankle,they just never feel quite the same and sometimes they hurt,lets just all hope its the same case here.Lets see what he says after practice.

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  8. Well, if the official diagnosis is correct then it's not his hip.

    And I'd really like to be able to post a statement about all of this from David himself. But, once again, there is none. Not at this moment.

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  9. Yeah,he will probably give a statement after training.They are starting tomorrow?

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  10. If you mean the DC team's training sessions - those will start on Sunday.

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  11. Yup,I was thinking about the DC training.Thats probably gonna be when he says whats going on.Nothing to do but wait.

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  12. Well, it would make my life as a blogger much easier if David and his camp didn't just leave it to sports journalists/presenters to break important news like this one. I mean, the channels are there - they just don't use them.

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  13. I know this is selfish of me, but if David takes a break at the time of year which stops me getting to see him play live for the third year running (Roland Garros, Queen's, Boodles and Wimbledon) then I am going to find it very difficult to forgive him.
    :(

    How can he be able to play DC if this injury is that bad? I know he has tunnel vision when it comes to DC, but that sounds like madness.

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  14. I just red a little bit about it.It really depends on how sever it is.If hes been playing tennis for 4 years with it it might not be that bad.It says on Wikipedia that for normal people they can return to work after a week or two but when it comes to hard work or sports the recovery is much longer and not even recommended.

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  15. Istabraq, it seems that it's a problem he has been playing with for the past four years... So it is possible. It's just not getting any better, nor will it go away.

    The speculations are starting now. Miche says David could have surgery after DC and skip the clay season to be back for Wimbledon or after it.
    But that's all just speculation...

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  16. It could be this,sports hernia. http://www.footballtimes.org/Article.asp?ID=159

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  17. Well, it would go just like last year - he wouldn't try to make it back for Wimbledon when the DC QF are coming up straight afterwards. He'd save himsself for what is more important to him.

    I suppose I should be more concerned about whether he can come back at all - I'm just very disappointed as I seem to have been waiting a long time to watch him play.

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  18. Adrian, the problem here is the mixture of terms. Apparently, it can either be a sports hernia (which wouldn't be so serious) or an inguinal hernia (which would require surgery). According to Salatino it's both - and that's precisely why I'd like to get important info like that directly from David's camp.

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  19. I think him not addressing it means that its either not that serious or that its very bad,which is very scary.

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  20. Well, the news is certainly a shocker. However, this is not such an unusual injury or one that's going to ruin the rest of his career. The recovery time from surgery is about 8 weeks, and really, other than the loss of conditioning David should be fine afterward. Seems like I hear about them mostly in American football and hockey. David should absolutely skip DC and have surgery now if that's what the doctors say. Playing only makes these things worse. Especially at the level of a professional tennis player. The rest of the boys should certainly be able to beat Romania. He's got to let go of his DC obsession on this one and think about the rest of the year. Although, I'm not a doctor I'm pretty knowledgeable on this stuff. I've had one myself.

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  21. You did? Okay, my first question would be - which kind? As that's also the big question with David here.

    Adrian, that's the "good thing" about David's info policy, which I've complained about on VD before. What's happening here is absolutely normal by his standards and not necessarily an indication of anything.

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  22. I didnt know that Inguinal Hernia could happen to you in yours 20s.

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  23. I agree the team can win the tie without him. Convincing him not to play will be the difficulty.

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  24. Mine was an inguinal hernia. I'm not sure about the exact difference. I know I definitely could not have played serious tennis.

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  25. Thanks. As far as I understand it, a sports hernia basically means having similar symptoms but without the actual damage. (And I was so hoping I wasn't going to have to read up on medical stuff again...)
    The thing is that if he needs surgery then that won't be too bad in itself but it'll take a while before he can train, let alone play matches again.

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  26. Yeah, Julia, that's what I understand also. Had to Google the subject to find out more. I think we just need to know how serious and which kind David actually has. Always mystery, isn't there?

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  27. Oh yeah...
    But that's exactly what I mean. Usually, I don't mind David moving in mysterious ways and keeping an equally mysterious silence about things. But it's moments like this when a clear statement from him would be really helpful.

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  28. So true, Julia. Especially since you're expected to be the purveyor of all things David.

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  29. My question is how do they know he's had the hernia (whichever type it is) for 4 years? That seems a rather arbitrary number. lol

    Hope he'll be ok, though, and no more surgeries...

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  30. As I've said - don't ask me. I have no idea how they arrived at that number.

    John, yeah well, I've done some complaining about this before...
    But on the other hand - if David had a super-informative, comprehensive and above all multilingual official site, then there wouldn't be much need for VD.

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  31. I'm glad David's site doesn't cut it. VD is much more fun. Damn, isn't this a roller coaster ride.?

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  32. Thank you. But to be honest I could really do with less drama at the moment...

    Anyway, it's good night from me. We'll see what tomorrow and the next few days will bring.

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  33. If its Inguinal hernia, means the only solution is surgery, means 3 month pause, and tons of complications after it, hernias are so delicate, i have attended 4 Operations, they simply attach the parts using a certain kind of materials, and they advice the patient not to lift heavy weights for 1 year, and David is gna play tennis? this is killing me.and play the DC to make the injury worst, thats not evergreen Nalbandian, its simply stupid Nalbandian, if thats what he is gna do, the rest of the guys will easily beat Romania without David.

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  34. Oh no David...
    I hoped so much that it is just a little thing. I wish he or his camp would give more information so that one can judge the situation better and that it give an idea on how long that can take.

    I go out for a walk and breakfast and hope to get it settled down a bit, because right now it makes me very sad and poor David is probably the one who is the saddest right now. I really hope that in that negative context it takes the most positive and shortest way to heal.

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  35. Noubar, the reason David still wants to play this tie could be that he needs to play DC at least once during this year or the next, otherwise he won't be allowed to take part in the 2012 Olympics. Maybe it's all about getting that out of the way.
    It could also mean something much worse - but I'm not going to go there.

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  36. Hi all:

    Before I leave out for work, just wanted to throw in my $.02. I read up on inguinal hernias, which sounds closest to what David could have. I understand that this is done as an outpatient procedure, with recovery time up to 8 weeks (as you all said). While I do not think it will spell career death, I think that he will be a while coming back. Not like the hip surgery though. And how the doctors came up with that 4-year speculation, I don't know. I'm guessing they used carbon-14 dating (LOL!!).

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  37. Thank for the update Julia,I hope its the first thing,not that much pain.

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  38. i didnt know about the olympic thing Julia, and i know what you mean about could be worst, i dont want to even think about it. I just cant imagine this thing will work without surgery, it will get bigger for sure

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  39. Exactly, Noubar and Tiffany. If it is what we think it is, he should have the surgery as soon as possible. That way he could be back training in early May. Delaying it would only screw up the early part of the summer again.

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  40. Ok, that's it! Please someone close to David could show a minimun of sense!! And I'm not talking about his team... at this point I mean his family, girlfriend, friends... could any of them just give him a good slap of his face (and I almost mean it literally) to make him react!! I know David's character, but his is beyond that? What are they going to expect? another Nalby vs Soderling, where he destroyed any chance of not scaping the hip surgery?
    The only solution is surgery. So GO AND DO IT, DAVID FOR THE LOVE OF CHIRST!!!
    What I'm going to say is cruel, I know, but his family (including Victoria or mostly her, because she never gets involved so it will shock him if she does) should make some intervention or similar. After all, they made sacrificies for David getting his career going on, but they all got a great living from David's money. Well, now the big producer of money shows he didn't learn anything from the hip injury. Now they have to make him understand how stupid it is. So, Alda, Dario, Javier, Vicky or even Jaite (who was the first person David talked about his hip surgery, even when Lobo was his coach)please give him a good bitch slap NOW.
    Or at least, Vazquez, please for the first time since you're in charge, please show some sense and don't call him. I think he saved Vazquez's ass last year not letting Argentina play the playoff to keep its possition at the world group. Now it's time to Vazquez to show he has the balls he claims he has. Mostly because, even if he doesn't care about David, the match is on clay... there's nothing that shows that David will be able to finish a 5 sets match... If nobody does nothing, I', all for wait for him at Parque Roca at the trainnings, kidnapping him so he can't play.
    And before someone says DAvid is an adult... David, when is related to the DC, makes less sense than a baby.

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  41. Anna, I for one think you should be a paid adviser on David's team.

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  42. I am shocked... speakless....

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  43. I don't have time for a proper update now but I just read on Fue Buena that David's problem is thought to be a sports hernia, in which case it might be manageable without surgery. Perhaps.
    More tomorrow.

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  44. Well, I made two predictions at the start of the year:

    1. He would lose early in the AO due to fatigue after playing the week before - HAPPENED.

    2. That he would get injured playing on clay between Melbourne and IW - HAPPENED.

    Like I said, when does the Washington draw come out?

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  45. 1. It was the Hewitt match, whether you can get that in your head, or not.

    2. You obviously didn't read the post - he's had this problem for several years, it could've started to bother him any time.

    But it's nice to see you so very concerned about David's well-being.

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  46. This is bad news for David, and I hope him the best although stuff like this always happens to him. I just wanted to ask about that Soderling match he played because I've heard a lot about it on here before but I don't know anything about that match and his hip,so a little info on that would help, thanks

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  47. Julia, I think I see your point now.
    His obsession with DC gives him something to hold onto. If he didn't have that, he might just give up and retire. I can imagine all these injuries is very difficult for him emotionally and makes it hard for him to keep up his motivation.

    On the other hand, he must feel incredibly encouraged to have reach # 19 in the world (after hip surgery) and doing so without really being %100 phsyically -- my guess is about 50-75%.
    This shows (mainly to himself!) that he still can get in the top 10 and then maybe more if he can just get healthy.

    And then, on the other hand, maybe he feels that the only thing worth playing for is DC. Top ten ranking, winning ATP 100 tournaments are not very
    motivating to him? Winning a Grand Slam is something that I think he has an interest in, but I don't think he believes he can ever do that.

    Anyway, very hard to figure out David's motivation (other than DC obsesessed), so no sense trying to hard to do so.

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  48. Joe, I agree with everything you just said. :)

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  49. Julia - so Fue Buena says it's (probably) a sports hernia? Is this a ray of (comparative) hope?

    For those of us VamosDaviders lucky enough NOT to have personal experience of hernias... did any of us guess just a day ago how much we'd learn about the damn things in the coming days?
    ;/

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  50. Istabraq - true, I'm learning a lot more about hernias (it's a bit common with men, so it's about time I learn something about it in hopes that I can avoid it).

    Yes, on this site, we learn a lot about health issues, injuries, etc.
    Following David means always having to keep track of a list of physical injuries.
    I actually don't mind since I learn a lot this way :)

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  51. Jeez Chris, thanks for the repeated, obnoxious, "I told you so" post. I knew we couldn't go too long with
    out hearing that broken record again.

    If David was so worn out from Auckland, how could he survive a marathon 5-set match with Hewitt? and win? and coming back from behind? a 4hr 48min match which almost broke the record of 5hr 14min?

    That really does sound like player worn out from too much play before starting his first round of the AO.

    I know you have some answer, some prediction, which says: "I am always right".

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  52. I understand that winning the DC is probably one of the few things that keeps David playing. That's why I could understand everything he did. But also, his obsession made him choose badly and cost him a lot in terms of health.
    The past year, David said that he realised that he still have some years to play and after all that he went through he enjoyed more playing and that he missed being on court. probably his happiness was related to the lack of pain from his hip (he spent almost two years playing and suffering a lot).
    Now he is the same position that he was in 08 against sweeden. He finally knows what feels playing healthy after a lot of time (minor injuries due to the time out of courts but no even near to what he felt) and he keeps doing the same he did. That's why someone should make him understand that he can't keep playing like that. The tie is more than accesible without him, it's clay even if it's an old problem, ok, but all the things just keep showing/or getting worse when he plays on clay. I agree about the Hewitt match and I'll add that he was not resting enough, he was having troubles to keep a logic sleeping schedule in AO (due to the problem when he travelled, to the Hewitt match) and he didn't rest (he doesn't have 20 years and he had a surgery). Now I have to go with Chris about this clay season: Cotorro and all his doctors were very clear. He must avoid clay. The Chile, Argentina, Mexico and DC was a calling for an injury. I understand that playing here and the DC is one of the things that David enjoys more. And at this point of his life ancd career?, I can understand and even justificate not following the doctors orders. For those TWO events, but the whole things? crazy, even if it's an ATP 500. (more when it's known the badly shape of Chile's court).
    As far as I understand if it's a hernia, the surgery will be the solution. The other things works to pospose the inevitable. Someone must make him understand that this is the same than his hip. The time for recovering is minimal for this, his tennis will be intact (because is natural), he will avoid the clay part (and he was only to play the necesary anyway)and he will be in better shape for Wimbledon and the next DC round.
    And at this point, I think his family should talk about him seriously. Because at the end (and I only going to say this once) what happened in 08? e was the stupid with the broken hip p´laying the finale while the other didn't give a shit, let the team in the midle of the finale and by magic he was ok and perfect 7 days after that. And the DC went to Spain. And the other one acting like the poor victim. I don't want to watch a remake of that movie, and I'm affraid that's what is going to happen.
    Probably not his brothers, buyt his mom and girlfriend should talk to him and make him put his feets on earth.

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  53. John H, the Söderling match was DC QF 2008. David already had trouble with his hip back then. He was in pain after playing on the first two days but still chose to play on the third day as well. That match (which David won 9-7 in the fifth) turned his hip problem into a real hip injury, the labrum tear for which he ended up having to have surgery.

    Istabraq, that's what they're saying. But without an official statement, it's still not really clear what kind of hernia David has.

    Anna, if David has to have surgery then the recovery time won't be minimal. It would be for a normal person but for an athlete it's a different scenario. Like with Chela who had an inguinal hernia, surgery, and ended up being out for eight months. It's not clear yet whether David will have to have surgery. But still, for me, the important question right now is where all of this is going to lead and what it will mean for David's career.

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  54. Apart from that - what's done is done. And before I'll start thinking about how David's schedule should look like in the future, I first want to know how bad this really is, what the consequences will be and when/if he'll be able to play healthy and without pain again.

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  55. I think Chela's time recovering took that long because he waited too much for the surgery. I don't remember any others players with a hernia surgery to compare how long they were out. The problem is we could never know what this could mean for his career. I mean, with his hip badly he won tournaments and reached DC and ATP finals. But it was like some time bomb: any minute could appear and everytime it got worse.With this, I'm affraid it wil be the same. And he already has the hip-surgery limitations. It´s not like he has the luxury to add more "don't do things" to the list. And if the recover takes 7 months? At this point, I think I preffer that, and at the end it will be better for him. He finally was enjoying playing pain-free to get back to the same? mentally, DC or not, that could be worst and put him out of playing for good. It's again playing equal to pain or affraid of hurt. A surgery is a surgery, but compared to the hip one is not that huge (at least from what I know) With pain I don't see him playing a lot more. David said that one of the things that made him enjoy tennis now, after the surgery, was that he didn't suffer anymore. He has the kind of play that could let him retire older than others (the only physical players). Like Agassi did.
    the new guys are already showing, if it's not easy now, with pain again or some "permanent problem"? I don't want to sound dramatic, but it could make him let everything.
    It's a decision that must be taken with a lot of thinking.. and with the DC so near? I don't trust David to do the thinking. That's why I think someone should intervine.

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  56. Hes a grown man,why should he talk to his mother about how to treat a injury.Im pretty sure Nalby,Lobo and probably another 10 people we dont even know about who are on his team will talk over the decision and the best one will be chosen,whether it is to play with this injury,try treatment without surgery or surgery he will do what he thinks is best for his tennis carer.

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  57. Anna, the problem is not the surgery itself but the recovery, as Noubar mentioned above.
    David has a game that is so beautiful to watch but that has also led to all the various injuries that he has had over the years. It's not simply that he's more fragile than other players, his way of playing takes its toll on his body. And to be honest, I've never thought he'll stay on the Tour for as long as Agassi did.
    But regardless of whether it would take 4, 6 or 8 months, I just can't help but wonder if this might be one injury too many. Whether David would want to go through this all over again. And that's why I want to know exactly what we're dealing with here.

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  58. You know, Julia, I don't know if his body's problem were not the result of his natural play and how easy is for him to do it. I mean he could replace the correct movements for other ones that could cause injuries in the long term, he someone keeps playing that way for a long time. What I mean is, he has some injury, he has the natural talent to manage to play with pay and hit the ball in some incredible ways. In 2007 he played AO with some tendinitis, he couldn't walk ok and he managed to reach 8th with a not so easy draw in conditions that other player could not pass the first round. After that tendinitis (that started at the indoor season in 06,wich means he played those incredible matches at the 2006 DC finale injured...) he went with a serious back problem (sometimes he couldn't even move)... he reached 8th at RG and almost leaved him out Davydenko... His hip problem started around the final part of 2007, the 2008 he played with a broken hip the major part of the time: he did DC final and won two ATP titles and had an incredible indoor season again. Another player with 10percent of those problem couldn´t even hit a ball. Of course that's a vicious circle: the more you play injured, more injured you get. David's natural talent and easy play made him win matches and play more, wich wasn't good because he got worse... At least that's my point of view. I think those injures are probably related in the sense of not doing the "correct movements" due to pain so you got injured or hurt in other parts besides the one that originally hurts.
    I didn't see him playing as much as Agassi at first, but last year, when after almost 4 years of playing with pain (tendinitis, back, hip, toes, etc) he was really happy of playing healthy that he enjoyed a lot being on court. If he can feel this way again, if he can enter a court without having to worry about "if I move this way, I'll in pain" he will be feeling the same.
    I think his body is just reflecting those past year of "abuse" if you want to call it that way.

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  59. sorry for the typing mistakes (besides the horrible english), but I wanted to write "if someone" instead of he someone or pain instead of pay.

    Adrian, normally he's a grown man, for everything... ExcePT one thing: the Davis Cup. He's irrational to the point of choosing to play and literally broke his hip for a DC match, he didn't want the surgery that year just because Argentina had a great draw, so he played with his hip broke the major part of the year, and yet, he had doubts about going to surgery because, if he did it, he couldn't play the DC tie... I think we have to thank god that the pain became so bad, if not... guess who was going to play against Berdych and Stepanek at the DC that year instead of Monaco, with a hip broken.
    Now, we have a good draw again (that means a lot to play on clay) and a choice to make really close to the DC tie. So, it's not that he has to consult or ask what to do... it's about someone making him understand the things... or at least slaping him in the face.Because with the Davis near, he has the maturity of a 3 years old

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  60. http://www.ubitennis.com/sport/tennis/2011/02/22/463228-tsonga_arrivederci_indian_wells_equipe.shtml
    tsonga has the same problem really intersting

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  61. Anna, it's not about his movements being correct or incorrect. It's just that the way he hits his groundstrokes is very demanding for his body. But it's also something that can't be changed just like that.
    I agree with you, the muscular injuries last year may have very well been related to him, being careful with his movement.
    But this is something else and as I've said before, I'd really like to know how bad it really is.

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  62. Well, David isn't going to chance his plans, acording to La Nacion.... he's going to play his two singles matches at the DC, he will be infiltrated (don't know the medical term in english, in spanish is "infiltracion") only if it's necesary (that kind of treatment only makes get worse at the end, because the pain goes away and you play but the injury is there, so...) and he will go to Us for the hard season. Cotorro is demanding more tests.

    One question, this was from 2007, right? If I don't remember wrong, his team thought that his hip problems at that time, before that soderling match, were really due to that sport hernia. Someone at Fue Buena was remembering that and I think I read that too at that time. So even if it didn't show any syptoms, why didn't they do the surgery when he was out if they knew it? And if they didn't know... well, when he was recovering, testing etc from his hip, his doctor, team, etc touched him not only at the hip but also, and it probably sound dirty, David groin was touched by everyone. Nobody could detect an hernia? I mean, they were making him move, controling everything he did, etc.. they didn't see it? it was really close to the problem zone... Weird.

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  63. So far, it only seems clear that he'll play singles on Friday. Everything else will depend on how he feels after that match (and how the tie is going for Argentina).
    That the plan still is to go to IW and Miami (if possible) doesn't mean that much, actual news about David's participation being in danger usually only come when he's actually pulling out.

    You mean 2008, I think. And yeah, back then hernia was rumoured to be his problem, around the time of his first-round Wimbledon exit.

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  64. Julia, what I wanted to say is that besides that (the way his groundstrokes demands his body) his a natural. He has such talent that he manages to replace movements he can't do due to pain/injury with others and still put the ball where he wants and win matches. But those movements (if the "right" ones are demanding, the other ones are worst in that sense and probably more dangerous because coudl lead to injuries in other parts) demanded a lot more from his body, so not only the past year but all the injuries before could be related between them in the sense that he was forcing his body way to much playing injured (like I said, since 06 he's having troubles) So besides his "normal" groundstrokes also, IMO, what itwas worst was all those years he was forcing more his body replacing those movement to others due to his tendinitis, back, hip, etc problems. Maybe if he didn't have that natural talent he probably would have stopped playing, getting ok and they came back. Instead he just managed to play and win, getting injured in other zones due to forcing more his body. It's like when you hurt your right leg and you still want to walk, so probably you'll end feeling pain in your left leg. And if you keep doing it you left leg will get injured too.

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  65. I must admit it had also occurred to me that the doctors might have spotted this hernia when they did David's hip surgery.

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